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Posts Tagged ‘Simplicity’

Devotional Poems by Jackie Duick

In 07 Observations on 2016/03/04 at 12:00 AM

Heavenly MOTHER

Our Heavenly Mother gives love to us on earth,

just as She gave Christ birth;

We will always be Her loving child,

She will always treat us tender and mild ;

Angels in Heaven bow to her,

She makes the love within us stir;

As She gathers us to her breast,

unto God She leaves the rest;

Heavenly Mother above I adore thee,

and pray for your love to guide me.

PRAYER

I sit before my Lord in quiet prayer,

there is a gentle stillness in the air;

I talk to Him with my mind,

knowing His presence will be a gentle kind;

I pray I will be led to do His will,

but to find out how I must be still;

He touches my heart with peace and love,

that can only be sent from above;

So put your trust in our Lord in prayer,

and for your sake He will always be there.

 

           THE TONGUE 

The strongest muscle in our body would surprise us all,

the tongue is the thing that can cause anyone to fall;

It can be used for good as in praise or laughter,

or it can create scares for now and ever after;

Our tongue creates gossip good or bad,

and bad gossip makes so many sad;

We don`t realize the damage that can come about,

at times it causes others to sit and pout;

So be kind in your talks about others today,

and omit sordid feelings and send the away.

 

          3 AM HOUR

It`s the 3 AM hour in the middle of the night,

said to be Satan`s hour what a fright;

Why is he angry this evil soul,

because Jesus rose at that hour when He made us all whole;

Satan thought he won when Jesus died on the cross,

but alas at 3 AM Satan`s at a loss;

For Jesus has risen at this timely hour,

and Satan knows he`s lost power;

For Jesus has risen at His chosen time,

to let mankind know you are mine.

Heavenly Love

When I go to sleep at night,

Angels are there to tuck me tight;

Stars are shinning from above,

Angels giving me Heavenly love;

Moon shines bright to guide their way,

leading the Angels here to stay;

In the morning when I awake,

I thank God for His partake;

As the day time moves along,

it brings the night time with a song;

As our Heavenly Mother looks down on us,

love is sprinkled like stardust;

God is deep within my heart,

and I know we`ll never part.

OUTSIDE OF TIME

What if we could rise out of our body and look down from above,

and fly through the air just like a dove;

Would we see history fly by,

as we soar about the sky;

Would we see the future of our life,

and would it cause us great strife;

Would we want to come back and be grounded again,

if we did so would we remember where we`ve been;

Outside of time could be a great adventure,

but is it really worth trying you have to be sure;

Cause to be stuck outside of time,

could disturb your peace of mind.

  • WE SEE DEATH THEY HAVE REBIRTH

What can I say about death that scares us all,

we all at sometime await the dreaded fall;

Whether it be family, friend or me,

we don`t know when the time will be;

Sometimes it`s unexpected this twist of fate,

that will put us in front of St. Peter`s Gate;

We can only pray and morn for the ones who die,

and wipe the tear from our eye;

In our hearts they will always stay,

as we go about our normal way;

What awaits us all we do not know,

but we long for Heaven when we go;

We want to soar on gossamer wings,

as we hear the song the Angel sings.

by

Jackie Duick

 

 

 

PEN IN MY HAND

Pen in my hand to create a line,

and I will try to make it rhyme;

Thoughts come to me and go,

what I may write next I do not know;

So many topics come to mind,

it`s a wonderful way to spend my time;

I can go to a world of make believe,

and with words in and out I can weave;

Some tell a story some do not,

what ever I create it is all my thought;

So sit back and enjoy a poem that is written,

and you just might be smitten.

“May you not lack simplicity”

In 01 Daily Meditations on 2015/05/22 at 12:00 AM

 

Look: the apostles, for all their evident and undeniable defects, were sincere, simple… transparent. You too have evident and undeniable defects. May you not lack simplicity. (The Way, 932)

The first Apostles, for whom I have great affection and devotion, were nothing to boast about, humanly speaking. With the exception of Matthew, who probably earned a comfortable living which he left behind at the behest of Jesus, the Apostles were mere fishermen. They lived a meager existence, fishing all night to keep food on the table.

But social status is unimportant. They weren’t educated; they weren’t even very bright, if we judge from their reaction to supernatural things. Finding even the most elementary examples and comparisons beyond their reach, they would turn to the Master and ask: “Explain the parable to us” [1]. When Jesus uses the image of the “leaven” of the Pharisees, they think that he’s reproaching them for not having purchased bread [2].

They were poor; they were ignorant. They weren’t very simple or open. But they were even ambitious. Frequently they argued over who would be the greatest when — according to their understanding — Christ would definitively restore the kingdom of Israel. Amid the intimacy of the last supper, during that sublime moment when Jesus is about to immolate himself for all of humanity, we find them arguing heatedly [3].

Faith? They had little. Jesus Christ himself points this out [4]. They had seen the dead raised, all kinds of sicknesses cured, bread and fish multiplied, storms calmed, devils cast out…

And did these men of little faith at least stand out in their love for Christ? Undoubtedly they loved him, at least in word… They are ordinary men, complete with defects and shortcomings, more eager to say than to do. Nevertheless, Jesus calls them to be fishers of men [5], co‑redeemers, dispensers of the grace of God. (Christ is passing by, 2)

[1] Matt 13:36: Domine, edissere nobis parabolam

[2] Cf Matt 16:6‑7

[3] Cf Luke 22:24‑27

[4] Cf Matt 14:31; 16:8; 17:17; 21:21

[5] Matt 4:19 [Top]

“Through daily life, give a proof of faith”

In 01 Daily Meditations on 2014/01/24 at 12:00 AM

Many things, whether they be material, technical, economic, social, political or cultural, when left to themselves, or left in the hands of those who lack the light of the faith, become formidable obstacles to the supernatural life. They form a sort of closed shop which is hostile to the Church. You, as a Christian and, perhaps, as a research worker, writer, scientist, politician or labourer, have the duty to sanctify those things. Remember that the whole universe – as the Apostle says – is groaning as in the pangs of labor, awaiting the liberation of the children of God. (Furrow, 311)

I have often spoken of it before, but let me insist once again on the naturalness and simplicity of St Joseph’s life, which was in no way remote from that of his neighbours, and which raised no artificial obstacles to his dealings with them.

So, though it may be proper to some periods or situations, I do not like to talk of catholic workers, catholic engineers, catholic doctors and so on, as if describing a species within a genus, as if Catholics formed a little group separate from others. That creates the impression that there is a chasm between Christians and the rest of society. While respecting the contrary opinion, I think it more correct to speak of workers who are Catholics, or Catholics who are workers or engineers. For a man of faith who practices a profession, whether intellectual, technical or manual, feels himself and is in fact at one with others; he is the same as others, with the same rights and obligations, the same desire to improve, the same interest in facing and solving common problems.

The Catholic who is prepared to live in this way will, through his daily life, give a proof of his faith, hope and charity: a simple and normal testimony without need of pomp and circumstance. The vitality of his life will show the constant presence of the Church in the world, since all Catholics are themselves the Church, because they are members in their own right of the one People of God. (Christ is passing by, 53)

“Exercise care in little things”

In 01 Daily Meditations on 2013/04/04 at 6:15 AM
Care in little things requires constant mortification. It is a way to make life more agreeable for others. (Furrow, 991)

Thinking of those of you who, despite years of experience, still go about dreaming — with vain and childish dreams, like those of Tartarin of Tarascon — imagining they are hunting lions in the corridors of their homes, where the most they will find are mice, if that; with, I insist, such people in mind, I can only remind you how great a thing it is to be accompanying God through the faithful fulfilment of your ordinary daily duties, coming through struggles which fill Our Lord with joy, and which are known only to him and to each one of us.

Rest assured that you will usually find few opportunities for dazzling deeds, one reason being that they seldom occur. On the other hand, you will not lack opportunities, in the small and ordinary things around you, of showing your love for Christ. (…)

You and I must therefore seek to make use of even the most trifling opportunities that come our way, to sanctify them, to sanctify ourselves and to sanctify those who share with us the same daily cares, sensing in our lives the sweet and inspiring burden of the work of co‑redemption. (Friends of God, 8-9)

“Through daily life, give a proof of faith”

In 01 Daily Meditations on 2012/06/27 at 9:11 AM
Many things, whether they be material, technical, economic, social, political or cultural, when left to themselves, or left in the hands of those who lack the light of the faith, become formidable obstacles to the supernatural life. They form a sort of closed shop which is hostile to the Church. You, as a Christian and, perhaps, as a research worker, writer, scientist, politician or labourer, have the duty to sanctify those things. Remember that the whole universe – as the Apostle says – is groaning as in the pangs of labor, awaiting the liberation of the children of God. (Furrow, 311)

I have often spoken of it before, but let me insist once again on the naturalness and simplicity of St Joseph’s life, which was in no way remote from that of his neighbours, and which raised no artificial obstacles to his dealings with them.

So, though it may be proper to some periods or situations, I do not like to talk of catholic workers, catholic engineers, catholic doctors and so on, as if describing a species within a genus, as if Catholics formed a little group separate from others. That creates the impression that there is a chasm between Christians and the rest of society. While respecting the contrary opinion, I think it more correct to speak of workers who are Catholics, or Catholics who are workers or engineers. For a man of faith who practices a profession, whether intellectual, technical or manual, feels himself and is in fact at one with others; he is the same as others, with the same rights and obligations, the same desire to improve, the same interest in facing and solving common problems.

The Catholic who is prepared to live in this way will, through his daily life, give a proof of his faith, hope and charity: a simple and normal testimony without need of pomp and circumstance. The vitality of his life will show the constant presence of the Church in the world, since all Catholics are themselves the Church, because they are members in their own right of the one People of God. (Christ is passing by, 53)

“The way to cut short all the evils is to pray”

In 01 Daily Meditations on 2012/02/21 at 9:11 AM
The way to cut short all the evils we suffer is to pray. (The Forge, 76)

Remember that prayer does not consist in making pretty speeches, or high‑sounding or consoling phrases. Prayer, at times, will be a glance at a picture of Our Lord or of his Mother; sometimes a petition, expressed in words; or offering good works, and the fruits of faithfulness. We have to be like a guard on sentry duty at the gate of God Our Lord: that’s what prayer is. Or like a small dog that lies down at his master’s feet. Do not mind telling him: Lord, here I am, like a faithful dog; or better still like a little donkey, which will not kick the one who loves him. (The Forge, 73)

Your prayer cannot stop at mere words. It has to lead to deeds and practical consequences. (The Forge, 75)

Heroism, sanctity, daring, require a constant spiritual preparation. You can only ever give to others what you already have. And in order to give God to them you yourself need to get to know him, to live his Life, to serve him. (The Forge, 78

Beatitudes Vocabulary

In 06 Scripture & Theology on 2011/07/30 at 6:56 AM

Pure in Spirit/Simplicity

The poor in spirit are those who remember that all they are and have is from God and give back to Him whatever He wants of them. We live the virtue of simplicity when we maintain the proper intention in our love for Our Lord.  Simplicity, which is close to humility, will lead us to ask forgiveness often; it leads us to admit and correct our mistakes.

The  spirit of divine sonship means being completely dependent on our Heavenly Father  by abandoning ourselves confidently to his loving Providence, just as a child entrusts everything to its father.  A child does not hold grudges, is ignorant of duplicity or fraud, does not deceive, does not seek revenge, easily forgets, does not store up grievances and has no deep sorrows.

Simplicity is one of the principal manifestations of spiritual childhood. It is the result of becoming defenseless before God like a vulnerable and trusting child before its father. Spiritual childhood always holds to the freshness of love in a soul by not dwelling on adverse experience.

The simple person is not naive yet neither suspicious, prudent but not distrustful. He lives the teaching of the Christ, being wise as serpents and innocent as doves. Thus, the most sublime doctrine becomes accessible to the most simple souls.

The real cause of egotism and selfishness is pride.  It looks at everything from our its own viewpoint and it’s own agenda.  Pride inflates one’s own abilities, aggrandize one’s own qualities and demands the attention of others to them.  Consequently, proud people are egocentric and selfish, not really knowing how to love anyone but themselves, loving only for what they can obtain from others for themselves.

To conquer this vice, we must fix our gaze on Christ, admitting our mistakes and correcting them. Thus, we will grow in humility, thanking God for all the benefits received from Him, allowing ourselves to be helped, seeking advice, stopping excusing our sins and failures, asking forgiveness of those we offend.

MEEKNESS / HUMILITY

Meekness is rooted in spiritual strength, and it is really the meek who are truly strong. Meekness blunts the sharp arrows of anger like a protective shield.  Meekness ignores impatience, irritation, bad tempered and hateful attacks, actions which reveal fundamental weakness.  Meekness sets its face against those pointless displays of violence which at the bottom are really signs of weakness.

Meekness does not waste energy on anger and passes it by in silence or with a smile that is a disarming weapon of defense.  A meek person suffers unjust persecution, remaining serene and humble, not giving way to resentment or discouragement.

A lack of humility and interior peace are at the bottom of irritability.   Explosive irritability corrodes love.  It destroys peace in prayer because it broods over perceived injuries and forgets about God to whom it should appeal for help.

The lack of meekness comes from pride.  To master one’s self is to prevent quick and wounding responses.  Thus, the meek will inherit the earth because they will not be slaves to impatience and bad temper.  Instead, they will be serene in the possession of God with their souls seeking Him in prayer. Through kind-heartedness and understanding the people around them, they will, instead, win friendship and love.

We learn to be humble by meditating on the Passion of our Lord who suffered so many humiliations and by considering His humility in the Holy Eucharist where He waits for us to visit Him and speak with him.  Therefore, we can walk the way of meekness accepting humiliations, accepting our defects and struggling to overcome them.  Then, we will find in Him, who carries the greatest portion of our burdens, a yoke that is easy and a burden that is light.

PURE OF HEART

To be clean of heart means to be selfless, viewing all from God’s point of view rather than our own.  This singleness of purpose is putting God first, without self-deception or compromise, keeping the heart healthy and clean so as to please God.

In order to be pure of heart, we need to remove all obstacles. One’s whole being is defiled by what occurs in the heart.  Evil desires and intentions are conceived in the heart before they become an external reality.  It is in the heart that God is either loved or offended.  It is what we speak from the heart that defiles us. We must look for God in every circumstance and purify ourselves by asking forgiveness for our sins and errors.

God himself and His creation can only been seen by those whose intentions and attitudes are good.   God is looking for each one so that a Christian who sincerely searches for Christ will find him because Christ is searching for him.

MERCY

We will only have mercy in our hearts when we offer mercy, when we forgive, our enemies from the example and with the help of Christ.

Mercy is not simply a matter of giving alms to the poor, but also of being understanding of other people’s defects, overlooking them, helping them not only to cope with them but to love  them despite whatever defects they may have.  Mercy also suffers and rejoices with others.

PEACEMAKER

Peace is a clear sign of God’s nearness and closeness to us.  St. Paul consistently exhorted the first Christians to live in peace, saying that the God of love and peace would be with them. True peace results from holiness. St. Augustine also describes true peace as the tranquility of order.

True peace means being concerned about others, being interested in their plans and projects, their joys and sorrows.  God wants us Christians to bring peace and joy with us wherever we go.  Then, we can say as St. Paul ends his first letter to the Corinthians: “My love be with you in Christ Jesus.”

All the Beatitudes express in figurative language the promised reward of heaven.

So, in conclusion, what does the spirit of the Beatitudes mean to the Christian?  It means viewing the world as Christ views it and then reacting to circumstances as Christ Himself would react.  For us, the real Christian spirit is summarized in the eight Beatitudes and in the life of Our Master to whose likeness we desire to be transformed.

Listen to the Little Child

In 06 Scripture & Theology on 2011/05/04 at 7:17 AM

Years ago I was told an inspirational incident: A teacher had asked the children to bring back from Easter celebrations something that made Easter meaningful to them.  Easter Monday the children enjoyed showing each other what they had brought.  They all made fun of one little fellow that they considered “slow” or “out of it” because all he brought was an egg shell.   However, that was only until the teacher asked the little boy its meaning. With the simplicity our Lord recommends, the child said joyfully: “Well, the shell is empty because He IS risen.”  The classroom was filled with stunned silence and admiration.