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Posts Tagged ‘Listening’

A Word to the Wise

In 07 Observations on 2016/08/19 at 12:00 AM

Always keep in mind that you have absolutely no right to make known to others what you think about anybody, particularly their defects or problems. Once uttered, words cannot be recalled and the damage it done. Gossip is a form of character assassination. We know calumny is a malicious lie; slander, a debasing of the person; yet, the most common is detraction which is revealing a true fact but one that you have no right to share. Shattering a person’s reputation cries to heaven for vengeance.

Beware of launching into whatever is on your mind. Beware of curious prying. Instead, have a listening ear for the person as if no one else in the world exists. If you start to talk, particularly about a strongly held opinion, you might derail the opportunity and become ineffective. To argue or challenge in some cases cause damage. Instead, be prudent and use common sense. Make every effort to understand the person’s point of view. This engenders trust and permit the person to open up in a way that will make it possible for you to encourage them in following Christ Himself.

It is in our neighbor that God comes to us. Always deal with the person as you would deal with Christ. So, remember that the person you are dealing with has been sent to you by Christ and you are dealing with Christ in them, no matter how disfigured that image seems to you.

Do you recognize Christ in others? If not, why not?

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Christ’s Message is Mercy

In Uncategorized on 2013/04/03 at 6:19 AM

For this Mercy Sunday, and excerpt from a previous Sunday re God’s Mercy

The Gospel narrates the story of the adulterous woman whom the Pharisees want to stone. Instead, Christ forgives her, and those who accused her disperse, intimidated by Jesus’ bending down to write on the ground with His finger.

In his homily, the Holy Father recalled that, before this story, Jesus had retired to the mountain to pray and later had gone down to the Temple where everyone listened to him. In the end, they left him alone with the woman. “Jesus’ solitude!”, he said. “It is a fruitful solitude—both that of His prayer with the Father as well as the other, so beautiful, … of his mercy toward this woman. This is the Church’s message today.”

“There is a difference between the people,” he continued. “On the one hand are the people who come to listen to him and before whom He takes a seat and teaches. These are the people who want to listen to Jesus’ words; the people with open hearts, in need of the Word of God.” Nevertheless, “there were others who didn’t listen, who could not listen. Among those were the ones who had gone to him with that woman, wanting him to condemn her. … I also think we are like this people who, on the one hand want to listen to Jesus, but, on the other hand, at times, like to be cruel to others, isn’t that right? To condemn others, right? This is Jesus’ message: mercy. On my part, I say it with humility; this is the the Lord’s strongest message: mercy. He himself said: ‘I did not come for the righteous’. The righteous can justify themselves. … Jesus came for the sinners.”

For example, think of the gossip after the call of Matthew: ‘but that one keeps company with sinners!’ And He has come for us, when we recognize that we are sinners. But if we are like the Pharisee before the altar—’Oh God, I thank you that I am not like the rest of humanity—greedy, dishonest, adulterous—or even like this tax collector.’—then we do not know the Lord’s heart and we will never have the joy of feeling this mercy! It is not easy to trust in God’s mercy because it is an incomprehensible abyss. But we must do it!”

The Pope explained that sometimes people say to priests: “’Oh, Father, if you knew my life you wouldn’t say that.’ ‘Why? What have you done?’ ‘Oh, I’ve done bad things.’ ‘Good! Go to Jesus; He likes you to tell him these things. He forgets. He has the special ability to forget. He forgets them, kisses you, embraces you, and tells you only: ‘Neither do I condemn you. Go and sin no more.’ He only gives you this counsel. A month later we are the same … We return to the Lord. The Lord never tires of forgiving us, never! We are the ones who get tired of asking forgiveness. Let us ask for the grace to never tire of asking forgiveness, because He never tires of forgiving us. Let us ask for this grace.”

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